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One for the Books

One for the Books

AOL.com has run a story broken by Associated Press about a Santa Barbara-based financial advisor who cobbled together the world’s most valuable life insurance policy for an anonymous Silicon Valley billionaire. With a payout of more than $200 million, it slightly more than doubles the $100 million policy sold to David Geffen in 1990. It’s tempting to speculate why a billionaire would take such an action. After all, if he’s worth so much money, why does he need life insurance?
Filed in: Life Insurance, Other
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Taxing Choices: Part 3

Taxing Choices: Part 3

In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling last June that overturned DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act), gay and lesbian couples who married in states where same-sex marriage is legal can now file either as “married filing jointly” or “married filing separately.” In fact, they have to. And according to couples interviewed in a recent New York Times article, even if it means paying higher taxes, they are thrilled.
Filed in: Other, Tax Planning
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Health Care in the Long Term

Health Care in the Long Term

A lot of attention has been paid to health insurance now that the Affordable Care Act is the law of the land. And regardless of where you stand on the law, the idea of more people having health insurance – thus spreading the risk pool – is a good one.
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You Have to Accentuate the Positive

You Have to Accentuate the Positive

Recently I wrote two posts on the dropping percentage of people who trust their fellow citizens. And one of the hardest hit areas for trust is the workplace. Employees don’t trust their leaders and they often have little reason to do so. Business leaders are in crisis mode
Filed in: Other
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Is Sixty the Magic Number?

Is Sixty the Magic Number?

Our financial lives are more or less ruled by the power of 10. The dollar is based on a decimal system (the dollar equals 100 cents), percentages that measure the growth of economies both personal and global are also based on factors that add up to 100. It’s easy to guess how this system developed:
Filed in: Other
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