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Five Mistakes Made by the Ultra-Wealthy to Avoid

Five Mistakes Made by the Ultra-Wealthy to Avoid

We generally assume that someone who has a lot of money must be really smart about money. Maybe. But according to “Rich Habits” author Tom Corley, who spent five years studying the habits of rich people, they don’t always know better. Here are five of the mistakes he and other wealth managers found that rich people make. Some may sound familiar to you. Some may be surprising.
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Legacy Planning in an Election Year

Legacy Planning in an Election Year

Election year is officially under way and with it comes the slew of campaign ads, increasingly tense debates – both on television and on Facebook – and the knowledge that before year’s end, all of us will have to cast our votes. Regardless of your positions on the issues at hand, one thing is certain and that’s change.
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Give the Gift of…Money

Give the Gift of…Money

You’ve heard the idiom that the only two guarantees in life are death and taxes. When the two intersect, there can be hell to pay. Maybe not hell but certainly the IRS. On a federal level, most people are protected by the estate tax exemption ($5.43 million in 2015) and don’t owe any of these transfer taxes when they die.
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Check Your Beneficiary Designations

Check Your Beneficiary Designations

I regularly urge readers to organize their estates and I’ve talked at length about including all assets in that planning, so I would be remiss not to mention an important piece of estate organization advice. Make a habit of periodically checking the beneficiary designations on your life insurance policies – as well as other financial accounts for which you may have beneficiaries. The reason for this is that these designations bypass your will. That means that the proceeds of the insurance are not controlled by your will but rather the beneficiary designation listed on your policy.
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Give Your Family the Roadmap to Your Legacy

Give Your Family the Roadmap to Your Legacy

Creating a legacy can be a dual effort but oftentimes one person in the household takes the lead on planning. It’s a natural approach because when one person does the job, you avoid duplication of effort. It would be easy to overlap if both you and your spouse were heavily involved in the planning process. While it makes sense to delegate the responsibility to one person, what if that person should die first?
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