Archive by Author

Success in Giving

Success in Giving

We have all been told that it is better to give than receive, but until organizational psychologist Adam Grant started his work, no one had actually proved that generosity could lead to economic success. According to The New York Times Magazine article, “Is Giving the Secret to Getting Ahead?” by Susan Dominus, Professor Grant is, at 31, the youngest-tenured and highest-rated professor at the Wharton School of Business.. He practices what he preaches: he is engaged with his students, providing advice and recommendations that are not only relevant, but scientifically proven, as well as being a devoted husband and father.
Filed in: Giving
0
Good Luck

Good Luck

One of my favorite sayings is “luck favors the prepared.” It’s more than being in the right place at the right time. For me, being prepared for luck is a three-part equation involving positioning, recognition and skill. First, place yourself in an atmosphere of opportunity; next, be sure you can recognize it when it comes; and, finally, cultivate the ability to seize the moment—be able act on and develop the insight. Opportunities exist everywhere, and cultivating a chance for achievement goes way beyond networking events. It helps if you have, as I do, a genuine love of talking to people.
Filed in: Preparation
0
Healthy Conversations

Healthy Conversations

An overwhelming majority (95% according to the Intra-Family Generational Finance Study by Fidelity Investments) of adult children and their parents agree it’s a good idea to have open conversations about the future. However, there seems to be little consensus beyond that. In fact, the study indicates that family members are more comfortable speaking about their financial situations to third-party financial professionals than they are to each other.
0
Balance

Balance

The word “balance” is a mainstay in the language of finance. There are balances of trade, balance sheets, bank balances and the Common Law of Business Balance, attributed to John Ruskin in the 19th century, which “prohibits paying a little and getting a lot.” (Or, in other words, you get what you pay for.) There is something to be said for that. I’m not talking about comparison shopping like looking for the best price for a particular TV or microwave. What I mean is that not all goods and services are created equal and their values (and costs) vary accordingly.
0
Fresh Perspective

Fresh Perspective

Over the last five years, it feels like everything financial has changed. Our roadmaps have turned into something unrecognizable and many of the fundamentals previous generations had come to take for granted have changed. Probably forever. This certainly is the case when we have to look at our investment strategies. Previously, the conventional wisdom for long-term investors was “60/40”: 60% of investments in stock or equities, and 40% in bonds. It was an easy, sound investing philosophy. But continuing low interest rates are having an effect on bonds and that “60/40” approach is being called into question.
0